David Farragut Burial Site

15 Jul

When David Farragut died in 1870, he was laid to rest in The Bronx’s Woodlawn Cemetery. For a refresher on Admiral Farragut, here’s my post on his Madison Square Park monument from back in November.

Farragut is probably the most well-known Civil War figure buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. He actually died of a heart attack in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, but his body was moved to New York for burial.

The burial site is spacious, and sits on a hill overlooking much of the eastern part of the Bronx.

It’s a rather dramatic site for such an interesting man, and deserves its placement on the National Register of Historic Places.

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David Farragut Grave 1

15 Jul

David Farragut 1

This is a full view of the Farragut burial plot. It includes markers where Farragut and his wife are buried, a memorial marker, the column in the middle, and the plaque in the foreground. The plaque explains that this site, as of 2012, is a National Historical Landmark.

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David Farragut Grave 2

15 Jul

David Farragut 2

Farragut’s headstone. Farragut’s wife is buried with him at Woodlawn. She died 46 years after he did, but he was also 33 years older than she.

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David Farragut Grave 3

15 Jul

David Farragut Grave 3

Here’s a closer look at the column that stands in the middle of the grave. Notice all of the cool detailing befitting of a deceased military man.

Confederate Generals in Woodlawn Cemetary

24 Jun

Woodlawn is in the Bronx and is one of the biggest cemeteries in New York City.

There’s plenty of notables buried here- Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Herman Melville, David Farragut. But, weirdly, there’s also four Confederate generals buried within its massive confines.

The following posts highlight each general- Deas, Gracie, Lovell, and Tilghman.

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Zachariah Deas

24 Jun

Zachariah Deas

Deas was born in South Carolina and rose to prominence as an Alabama cotton broker.

His service in the Mexican-American War and his financial contributions to raising a regiment helped give him command in the Confederate Army. Deas was wounded at Shiloh, and later served in Tennessee, Georgia, and the Carolinas. He never rose above the rank of Brigadier General.

Deas went back to the cotton business after the war before moving to New York City to work on the Stock Exchange.

He died in 1882.

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Archibald Gracie III

24 Jun

Archibald Gracie III

This unreadable headstone sits in Gracie family plot.

Gracie came from an affluent New York City family and graduated from West Point. The family business was in Alabama cotton, and those Southern ties lead to Gracie to join the Confederacy.

Gracie rose through the Confederate ranks and took command of a Brigade in 1862. He first served in Tennessee before being transferred to Virginia in 1864. The brigade took part in the Siege of Petersburg.

Gracie was killed by an artillery shell on December 2, 1864.

His body was returned to The Bronx for burial.

Gracie’s son, Archibald Gracie IV, famously survived the Titanic sinking.

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